Shipston Deanery Mission Statement

Shipston Deanery is a deeply rural area in South Warwickshire, populated by about 15,500 humans along with countless sheep, cattle, pigs and horses. They occupy one market town (Shipston), and nearly thirty villages and hamlets, with population ranging from below 100 to just over 1000.  Almost all of these have functioning places of worship, and are supported by communities who celebrate the love of God shown in Jesus Christ, and his involvement in every aspect of our day to day lives. Our churches are living, breathing spaces where we hope that people will have their eyes opened to the glory of God, where they will be surrounded by His peace, and discover what it is to be touched and transformed by God.
More than that, though, we want them to be place where you will meet God’s people, throughout this Deanery, who are committed to doing three things:

  • Worshipping God, in our lives as well as in our churches
  • Making new disciples, as we share with those we meet the wonder of a life with the Living God,
  • Transforming communities – having an impact on the challenges and problems around us, and making a difference to the communities in which we live. The area may be beautiful, but that hides just as much loneliness, poverty, abuse and need as anywhere else.

Members of our churches are dedicated to loving God and to loving others, to sharing the news of our Lord Jesus Christ with others, and to exploring what it means to be a Christian today. As a Deanery we aim to support and encourage each other as we discover together this wonderful journey of life in Christ.

UK Housing Timeline

getmemymortgage.co.uk provided us with the below content, please enjoy

Tudor – 1485 – 1603

tudor house

The Tudor house was defined by its Tudor arch and oriel windows. The Tudor period was the first period to move away from the medieval style houses and was more like a timber framed country house. Today Tudor houses are all listed building and highly sought after due to there location and the amount of space and history involved. Tudor houses are an expensive housing option so be prepared for the financial layout and upkeep costs. If that doesn’t put you off then buying a Tudor house could be a great investment and opportunity to keep English heritage alive.

Elizabethan – 1550 -1625

elizabethan house

Elizabethan houses can be recognised by their large vertical timber frames that are often supported by diagonal beams. The Elizabethan style houses were similar to medieval style houses. These houses were built sturdy to last through the age. The houses were built by the middle class are are today listed building.

Jacobean – 1603 – 1625

Jacobean house

The Jacobean style gets its name from King James 1 of England who reigned at the time. The Jacobean style in England follows the Elizabethan style and is the second phase of Renaissance architecture. May Jacobean houses were very large both inside and out with large rooms for family living.  Common features included columns and pilasters, arches and archades. These features were to create a sense of grandeur. There are many Jacobean style houses on the market today if your lucky enough to be able to afford one.

Stuart – 1603 – 1714

stuart house

One of the most common period property types for country houses. This period house boasted elegant exteriors with sash windows, high ceiling and spacious rooms. The outside was commonly bare brick and flat fronted.

English Baroque – 1702 – 1714

During this period houses were decorated with arches, columns and sculptures and took many features and characteristics from the continent. The interiors were very exuberant with artwork and ornaments in all rooms main rooms

Palladian – 1715 -1770

palladian house

The Palladian era started in 1715 and these types of houses are characterised by symmetry and classic forms, more plain than other eras however on the inside houses were lavish and often had elaborate decorations

Georgian – 1714 – 1837

georgian house

The Georgian house was styled with rigid symmetry, the most common Georgian house was built with brick with window decorative headers and hip roofs. The Georgian house period started and got its name due to the 4 successive kings being named George.

Regency – 1811 – 1820

regency house

The Regency housing style was common among the upper and middle classes from 1811 to 1820 the houses were typically built in brick and then covered in painted plaster. The plaster was carefully moulded to produce elegant decorative touches to give the exterior of the house more elegance.

Victorian – 1837 – 1910

victorian house

Very common even today especially in London. A Victorian house in general refers to any house build during the reign of Queen Victoria. The main features of a Victoria house are roofs made of slate with sash windows and patters in the brick work that are made using different colour bricks. Stained Glass windows and doors were also a common feature as were bay windows

Edwardian – 1901 -1910

edwardian house

Edwardian architecture got its name during the reign of King Edward from 1901 – 1910. These types of houses were generally built in a straight line with red brick. Edwardian houses typically had wooden frame porches and wide hallways. The rooms inside were wider and brighter moving away from the older style houses that were more gothic. Parquet wood floors and simple internal decoration was common also.

St Mary and Holy Cross, Alderminster

St Mary and Holy Cross in Alderminster is within the Archdeaconry of Warwick in the Diocese of Coventry

The church sits alongside what was an early horse-drawn tramway connecting Stratford-Upon–Avon and Moreton in Marsh. The churchyard that surrounds this pretty 12th century church is managed by Warwickshire Wildlife Trust and is a place of sanctuary for flowers, animals and wildlife. There is an interesting and informative display documenting this diversity in the porch. Walk around the side of the church and the path leads you to the river where a well-placed bench allows you to sit and enjoy the peaceful view over the River Stour. The church is open every day between 9.30am and dusk in the winter and 9.30am and 6pm in the summer months.

The Benefice of SW 7

Shipston Deanery is situated in the south of the Archdeaconry of Warwick with the Benefice of SW 7 lying to the south of the Deanery.

The SW 7 Benefice is made up of seven Parishes which include the following :-

  • Barcheston
  • Barton on the Heath
  • Burmington
  • Cherington with Stourton
  • Long Compton
  • Whichford
  • Wolford

The Benefice of Ilmington

Shipston Deanery is situated in the south of the Archdeaconry of Warwick with the Benefice of Ilmington lying to the west of the Deanery.

The Ilmington Benefice is made up of six Parishes which include the following :-

  • Ilmington
  • Preston On Stour
  • Stretton on Fosse
  • Tredington with Darlingscott
  • Whitchurch